It was only by accident that we stumbled on this very rare and forgotten Dutch Italian co-produced movie soundtrack. In 
a private movie archive in Italy we found the reel of the only known
(heavy cut) version of ‘Bogey In Sight’ named ‘Il nemico in vista’. Accompanying this reel were the master tapes of the original soundtrack. The Bogey In Sight soundtrack originally contained 12 tracks. Unfortunately three tracks seem to be forever lost. Luckily 9 of them are now restored and remastered for your listening pleasure.

Buy Digital here.
Buy 12 inch vinyl here.
Listen on Youtube.

Released December 11, 2015

Written by: A. Barber, T. Jackson, R. Lazzaro
Produced by: Roberto Lazzaro
Acoustic guitar: Abraham Barber
Drums & percussion: Thomas Jackson
Bass guitar: Scott O’ Neal
Electric guitar: Enzo Corrine
Mellotron 400 & String Arrangement: Egbert Willemse
Mixing engineer: Roberto Lazzaro
Original recording 1973

Cover Illustration: M. Ijsseldijk
Graphic design: Diether Eichler
Project coordinator: Diether Eichler
Remastered by: Killing Skills
Released by: Rundfunk Records & Redrum Recordz 2015

RFR001
RED046

LT. Barber & the Messengers
In loving memory of Abraham Barber (1942 – 1973)

Abraham Barber was born into a patriotic family in Littleton, Iowa. His father was a high ranking officer in WWII. After two years of law school Abraham volunteered for the US army out of love for his country and in pursuit of getting ‘something more’ from life itself. He served during the Vietnam war for three tours (‘67, ‘68, ‘69). In ‘68 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant for his outstanding leadership.

In ‘69 he was shot during an ambush at the village of Plei Lao Tchin near the Cambodian border. On November 5, at 8:00 p.m., 1969 the troopers racked the kill zone with M-16, M-60, and M-79 fire. They completely destroyed an entire NVA weapons platoon. Twelve American soldiers were wounded and three were killed in the line of duty.

Previous to this attack Abraham Barber had met Thomas Jackson, one of the soldiers in his platoon, who like himself was severely wounded. After rehabilitation they both moved to New York and became close friends. Jackson was schooled in playing the drums from the age of 6. Jackson eventually introduced Abraham to his band ‘The Messengers’ (not to be confused with the Minnesota rock group). The band’s original formation never had any big breakthrough, but with Abraham’s vocals Jackson believed it might eventually work. As a support act for a band called ‘Silencer’, they traveled throughout Europe. After a show in Rome they were approached by an Italian movie producer, Francesco Grieco. He was amazed by their performance and Abraham’s backstory. Francesco, who wanted to produce a Vietnam war exploitation movie, felt that The Messengers was the perfect band to write the score. The movie’s plot for ‘Bogey in Sight’ is set at the height of the Vietnam war: A two-squad search party is looking for a hidden prison camp, and ventures deep into the Cambodian jungle. By accident the two squads get split up and paranoia takes over, only to uncover a hidden mystery deep inside the sinister jungle.

They got into the recording studio together with producer Roberto Lazzaro who had worked with Scott O’Neal and Dutch orchestrator Egbert Willemse before. Later, during the studio sessions, Italian fuzz guitarist Enzo Corrine joined the band. It resulted in a series of hot summer sessions, and an unmistakable chemistry between the band members. The ‘Bogey In Sight OST’ was finished in the summer of 1973.

Then the unfortunate happened: Abraham, who was addicted to morphine during most of the period since the war in an effort to fight his depression, was found dead in a hotel room on the 26th of October. He died of an heroin overdose. Abraham Barber’s story is the nearly clichéd tale of a young man with patriotic dreams, who came back as a troubled soldier with second thoughts about life, duty, honour and his country. Neither the album, nor the movie, was ever released. After Abraham’s death The Messengers broke up due to differing views on the album’s copyrights. The final cut of the movie, which was shot on a low budget in the Philippines, ended up in the archives.